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Feats of Physicality or, Looking Stupid

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The Meyers Take on Weekly Yoga

a blog by Jim and Joy

JOY:

Sometimes I fantasize about applying for The Amazing Race. Part of it is the idea of escaping. I’d love to do something really dramatic to change my life. Also, Jim would be my teammate. We’d be gallivanting all over the globe, cracking up. I think about how Jim would feel if he had to watch me jump off a cliff or eat donkey doodie. He’d be proud! Ever since infertility became my reality, I’ve been this obsessed, depressed person. To have him see me able-bodied, smiling, FREE, would be excellent.

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Choosing a Gestational Carrier

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Important issues to consider.

Once you have completed an agency’s admissions process, you will be given the profiles of several surrogates. Usually, agencies will offer recommendations based on your individual needs and the availability of surrogates at that time. You have the opportunity to meet your potential surrogate at "match meetings," and decide if she is the right fit for you and your family. The surrogate can use these meetings to get to know you as well.

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In Vitro Maturation (IVM)

A safer and cheaper alternative to IVF?

In vitro maturation (IVM) was first developed in the early 1990’s to provide a safer and cheaper alternative to in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVM techniques are improving, and many fertility clinics throughout the U.S. are beginning to offer it.

How Does IVM Work?

The ovaries are minimally stimulated (meaning less fertility medications are used to make the ovaries produce eggs). Unlike traditional IVF where eggs are retrieved as close to ovulation as possible, IVM captures the eggs much sooner when they are still “immature.” The eggs are “matured” in the laboratory for about 24 to 48 hours using a culture medium containing small amounts of hormones. Once mature, the eggs are fertilized using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) – a very tiny needle containing one sperm is directly injected into the egg. The resulting embryos are transferred to the woman’s uterus.

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Share Your ONE THING for National Infertility Awareness Week

FertilityAuthority,  April 25, 2009
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Share Your ONE THING!

Last week, April 25 - May 2, was National Infertility Awareness Week®, a movement to raise awareness about the disease of infertility which affects 7.3 million Americans. You can learn more about NIAW by visiting RESOLVE and reading our Editors' Blog.

The Advocacy Sessions

On the frontlines of fertility policy.

by Barbara Collura, May 4, 2009

What is an advocate? And what does it take to be an advocate in the infertility community?

We often hear about the efforts of “just one person” and how he or she made a difference. We often hear a call-to-action to volunteer, stand up for what we believe in, and make change happen. But let’s face it, we don’t all have it in us to be “the one.” Some of us would rather not rock the boat. I do believe, however, that many of us want to experience the benefits that change provides.

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Ingredients for Advocacy

Reproductive Legal Update: May 2009

by Melissa Brisman, Esq., May 2009

So much has transpired in the world of reproductive law this month. Two court decisions came down dealing with a woman’s right to harvest the sperm of a deceased relative: one brought by a woman who lost her fiancé and the father of her two-year old child; the other by a mother who wanted to preserve a piece of her 21-year-old son. In other news, an Indiana court reversed an order of adoption granted in 2006 to a New Jersey resident over his adoptive twin sons. Finally, New Mexico has enacted, and Georgia is one step closer to enacting, new laws protecting of donors and recipients.

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May 2009 Reproductive Rights Watch

Fertility and the Pill

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Fertility and the Pill

a blog by Marie Lee

I get a lot of questions on my blog about the birth control pill and its possible effects on fertility. On a general level, synthetic hormones make me leery. I persuaded my mother to stop her hormone replacement therapy (which her doctor just put her on because “it was time”) even before they found out all the extra estrogen was giving women breast cancer!

Ob-Gyns’ standard line about the pill is that it is totally safe and studies show that it has no effect on fertility. These studies, however, generally look at how long it takes a woman to get pregnant after coming off the pill. They don’t take into account if she miscarries, has a baby with a birth defect, etc.

Boom or Bust?

By
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Boom or Bust?

a blog by Liz

I’m sure I’m not the only one cursing myself for not trying to breed earlier in my younger and (probably) more fertile days. At 32 (and 3/4), I am still considered young by doctors, acupuncturists and old-aged pensioners, but, after 2 1/2 years of not getting pregnant, I sure don’t feel it.

We had valid reasons for not trying to get pregnant when we were younger:

• We weren’t mature enough (still have doubts about that one);
• We wanted to establish ourselves in our careers;
• We needed to be in a place that had space for a child; and
• We wanted to have financial security.

Note that three out of four of those reasons for waiting are inextricably linked to cold, hard cash. Which is why trying to have a kid in these credit-crunched times might seem idiotic.*

Donor Egg Love

by Dena Fischer

When my husband and I were contemplating using an egg donor, one of the heart-wrenching fears that kept me up at night was that no one would ever say, “He looks just like you.” And if they did offer something like “She has your eyes,” I’d know it couldn’t be true and that innocent comment would rip off the scab that covers the wounds of infertility.

This, and many other questions such as, “Will my husband feel more connected to our baby than I will?; Will I bond with her?; Will my son one day shout, as an angry teen, ‘You’re not my real mother’?” kept me tossing and turning for months. But I swallowed my fears and together we forged ahead to build a family. Now, thanks to the miracles of science and the profound generosity of a gestational carrier and an egg donor, we have vibrant, eternally energetic twin boys.

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Midnight Uncertainties

Learning to Live with Infertility

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Learning to Live with Infertility

I seem to be at a loss for words these days. My head is such a confused, jumbled mess that, were I earning frequent flyer miles on my emotions, I'd likely have two roundtrip tickets to Fiji by now.

I guess somewhere deep in the crevices of my delusional mind there still exists a happy place where Santa Claus is real, wishes made on stars really do come true, and sex (or even a magical fertility clinic’s lab) actually equals babies. It is in this place where I also harbored the unrealistic idea that by simply going to my magical clinic of choice for our final IVF I would find that ever elusive step to “closure” an easy one.

Surprise!! Foiled again by the folds of infertility.

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