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Survey Reveals New Zealand Women's Fertility Concerns

Voxy,  Mar 16, 2012

An online survey conducted by Good Health magazine, to establish New Zealand women's views on fertility, has revealed some surprising results. The key problems New Zealand women said they encountered while trying to conceive were Endometriosis/Polycystic Ovarian (32%), unexplained infertility (31%), recurrent miscarriage (20%), age (16%), and male fertility issues (16%). In addition, 93 percent of Kiwi women agree more should be done to promote ways to improve fertility, and 63 percent have friends and family who have experienced fertility issues.

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DES: The Pill that Left a Generation Blighted by Cancer

Daily Mail,  Mar 12, 2012

Heather Justice was just 25 when cervical cancer struck. To save her life, surgeons had to perform radical — and distressing — surgery to remove her womb and vagina, but unfortunately that wasn’t the end of her ordeal. Further investigations led to the start of one of Britain’s longest-running and most shocking drug scandals. Heather, now 59, was the UK’s first confirmed case of DES-related injury. DES, or diethylstilboestrol, was prescribed to pregnant women — including Heather’s mother Gladys — from the 50s to the 70s in the mistaken belief that it prevented miscarriage.

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New Option for Fertility after Cancer

Fox 23,  Mar 6, 2012

A few weeks ago, 17-year-old Julianna Mai was diagnosed with cancer, and she is on her second round of chemo. Not only is she fighting cancer, she also had to make a choice about her future as a parent, a decision 130,000 newly-diagnosed cancer patients of reproductive age must make every year. Since Julianne needed chemo right away, she opted to have one of her ovaries removed and frozen for the future. Ovaries are transplanted either back in the forearm or chest wall because of the rich blood supply found there. Later, in-vitro fertilization can take place.

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Infertility 'More Common Among Childhood Cancer Survivors'

International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics,  Mar 7, 2012

Children who suffer from cancer are more likely to suffer from fertility problems as an adult, according to a German study published in Deutsches Arzteblatt International, which included the analysis of data from 2,754 former pediatric oncology patients. The authors suggested fertility protection measures should be explained to children with cancer and their parents before treatment is decided upon.

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For Sex, Christmas Outdoes Valentine's Day

UPI,  Mar 4, 2012

For sex, Valentine's Day cannot compete, at least statistically, with Christmas -- the time of year couples have the most sex, U.S. fertility experts said. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta showed more births take place in September than any other month of the year -- making December the month with the highest fertility rates.

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In the Year of the Dragon, Bay Area Couples Dream of Dragon Babies

MercuryNews.com,  Feb 26, 2012

Brandon Li and Catherine Xi don't consider themselves superstitious. Both engineers, they have careers in Silicon Valley's tech industry. But the Santa Clara couple, like many other Asians in the Bay Area, are frantic to have a baby in the Year of the Dragon. Some couples are taking ancient herbal remedies or even investing in expensive medical procedures to increase their odds of getting pregnant and having a child before the end of this lunar year, which began Jan. 23 and runs until Feb. 10, 2013, when the Year of the Snake begins.

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Ovarian Stem Cells Produce Eggs in Method That May Aid Fertility

Bloomberg Business Week,  Feb 26, 2012

Stem cells taken from human ovaries can produce normal, healthy eggs, scientists demonstrated for the first time in an experiment that may lead to new methods to help infertile women. The finding challenges a belief that women have a fixed number of eggs, or oocytes, from birth that are depleted by the time of menopause, and that their ovaries can't make make more. The research, led by Jonathan Tilly, director of Harvard University-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital’s Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, is published today in the journal Nature Medicine.

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Should You Just Keep Trying if You're Not Getting Pregnant?

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Try, try again. Does that apply when you're having trouble getting pregnant? Maybe.

You've heard it quite a bit. If you're under 35 and haven't been successful getting pregnant after trying for one year, go see a fertility doctor. The same goes for if you're over 35 and haven't been successful after trying for six months.

But now an Australian study has raised questions around that conventional wisdom. The study, published in Fertility and Sterility, found that one in four women with a history of infertility can still end up having a baby without fertility treatment.

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Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis Linked to Fertility Woes, Miscarriage

Health.com,  Feb 16, 2012

Women with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus often have fewer children than they’d hoped for, according to a new study. These autoimmune diseases, which typically develop during women’s reproductive years, cause fertility problems and miscarriage, researchers said.

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Many Young People Think They Can't Get Pregnant: Study

The Globe and Mail,  Feb 8, 2012

Women in their 30s can’t escape dire warnings about having kids “before it’s too late.” For young women, though, the message about infertility may be too loud and not altogether clear. As many as 19 per cent of women aged 18 to 29 believe they’re infertile, according to a study from the Guttmacher Institute, a New York-based non-profit organization devoted to reproductive health. But in reality, only 6 per cent of women in this age group are likely to have trouble conceiving within a year of trying (the medical definition of infertility).

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