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Miscarriage

A miscarriage is the loss of a pregnancy before 24 weeks and occurs in 15 to 20 percent of pregnancies.

Miscarriage Articles

A miscarriage is a shock, no matter how early in the pregnancy it happens. You may learn about the pregnancy loss only when a routine ultrasound indicates that the fetus has died. Spotting, cramping or heavy bleeding that indicates or accompanies a miscarriage can be frightening. It is common to experience a series of emotions ranging from disbelief, anger, sadness, and grief. Partners often respond in different ways at different times. Men may feel they have to be strong for their partner and as a result do not allow their feelings to surface.

In the world of fertility treatment, pregnancy and miscarriage are delicate topics. We strive to reach the end of the first trimester, so we can finally exhale ever so slightly after 12 weeks of carrying our eggs in one basket, literally. The fact of the matter is, 1 in 5 pregnancies will end in miscarriage and more than 50% of those are due to chromosomal abnormalities.

A miscarriage refers to the loss of a pregnancy and is estimated to occur in 15 to 20 percent of all pregnancies. Most miscarriages occur during the first 13 weeks of pregnancy, though they can occur later on in the pregnancy.

Miscarriage Videos

How are Immunological Issues Treated?

Carolyn B. Coulam, M.D., is an associate physician at Reproductive Medicine Institute and is Board Certified in the specialty of obstetrics and gynecology and in the sub-specialty of reproductive endocrinology. Here, she discusses whether or not immunological issues can be treated for.

Are There Signs that You Might Have Immunological Issues Causing Infertility or Miscarriage?

Carolyn B. Coulam, M.D., is an associate physician at Reproductive Medicine Institute and is Board Certified in the specialty of obstetrics and gynecology and in the sub-specialty of reproductive endocrinology. Here, she discusses whether or not there are signs to determine if immunological issues are causing infertility or miscarriages.

How are Immunological Causes of Recurrent Miscarriage Determined?

Carolyn B. Coulam, M.D., is an associate physician at Reproductive Medicine Institute and is Board Certified in the specialty of obstetrics and gynecology and in the subspecialty of reproductive endocrinology. Here, she discusses how immunological causes of recurrent miscarriage are determined.