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Freezing Your Eggs in North Dakota

Egg freezing is a type of fertility-preserving procedure in which a woman's healthy eggs are harvested and then frozen so they remain viable. Recently, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine lifted its "experimental" label from the procedure, as new evidence has shown that the technique can produce pregnancy rates comparable to IVF using fresh eggs.

Many women choose to freeze their eggs if they know they'd like to have a child one day, but feel the time isn't right to do so now. This can be due to social issues--perhaps the woman hasn't yet met the partner she'd like to raise a family with, or maybe she has educational or career goals she'd like to attain first. Other women may choose to freeze their eggs for medical reasons, such as necessary treatment that may leave them infertile.

How does Egg Freezing Work?

The greatest probability for success with egg freezing exists if a woman freezes her eggs in her 20s or early 30s, as egg quality declines as a woman ages.

As with any fertility procedure, it's important to seek out a fertility clinic that has experience and successful outcomes with egg freezing. After meeting with a fertility doctor, you'll undergo some tests, like blood work and ultrasound. You will then take fertility drugs for ovarian stimulation--this will increase the number of eggs for harvesting.

When your eggs are ready, you'll be given a "trigger shot" to jumpstart the retrieval process. Approximately 36 hours after this shot, your fertility doctor will begin the actual retrieval. While you are under anesthesia, your doctor will use an ultrasound-guided needle to harvest your eggs. Then, they will be frozen. A new technique called vitrification will usually be used, as this has been shown to preserve egg quality. Your eggs will then be stored until you need them.

Where Can I Freeze My Eggs?

For information on finding a fertility clinic or frozen egg bank for egg freezing and/or storing, visit

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