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Fertility Blogs

A blog by Megan Swanek, February 14, 2017
In my career as a school counselor, one of the main things I don't do is give advice. People generally don't follow advice that another person gives, plus we should never put ourselves in a position of presuming to know what is best for another person. But I have some advice to share if you or someone you know suffers a miscarriage. Just a few things that have helped me since that awful day almost a month ago, when I learned at a routine appointment that she had no heartbeat.

A blog by Neway Fertility

Infertility comes with many emotions. Hidden emotions of infertility are a common struggle and many couples often find themselves dealing with and feeling like they have no one to talk to. Should you keep those emotions hidden or should you openly share your struggle? Self-esteem, depression and stress are the three most common emotions and addressing them during this emotional roller coaster is proven to help you work through infertility and the struggle with this disease.

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a blog by Cindy Bailey of the Fertile Kitchen™

Body mass and body fat both play an important role when looking at weight and fertility.

The Ideal BMI for Fertility

If you are having trouble trying to conceive or suspect you have infertility, you might be wondering which doctor is right for you: OB-GYN or Reproductive Endocrinologist (fertility doctor). As a former fertility patient myself and huge fan of my OB-GYN, I went through a wavering thought process before I made the call to my fertility doctor: “Why can’t I just work with my OB-GYN and take Clomid?”... “Ok, I know we can do this!”... “The thought of a fertility clinic is intimidating!”... “Does this mean I need to do IVF?”... “The fertility doctor will know how to treat us!”

A blog by Kym Campbell

Men taking antioxidant supplements to improve their fertility is a trend that is growing in close proportion to both the increasing prevalence of subfertility in couples trying to conceive, as well as the increasing awareness that male factors can be a significant problem during this potentially challenging phase in a couple’s relationship. It is well known now that male factors are the sole cause of infertility in 30% of couples who have difficulty conceiving, with another 20% attributable to both male and female factors.

a blog by

Did you know men have healthier sperm in the winter and spring? I didn’t, but I wonder if that is the reason my in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle in April 2010 was successful.

A new study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology examined semen samples of 6,455 men, between January 2006 and July 2009, who were being treated for male factor infertility. Researchers found higher count, higher motility, and fewer men exhibiting morphology problems when the sample consisted of sperm made in the cooler months. A sperm production cycle takes approximately three months, so sperm produced in the fall was likely collected in the winter and sperm produced in the winter was likely collected in the spring. Sperm quality showed a steady decline into the summer and fall months, sperm which would have been produced in the spring and summer months.

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a blog by Eric Levens, M.D.

Welcome to my blog, The Fertile Future! I'm Eric Levens and I’m a board-certified infertility physician practicing at Shady Grove Fertility in the Washington, D.C. area. This blog will address many of the common questions and concerns that couples and individuals have when they consider whether to pursue fertility evaluation and treatment.

So let’s get started at the beginning! Many people are surprised to learn that infertility is a medical disease, defined as the inability to conceive after 12 months of unprotected intercourse (after 6 months for women ≥35 years of age).

For many having difficulties conceiving, one of the greatest hurdles is making the first step: Scheduling an appointment to see an infertility specialist. This is understandable, given so few other events in life are so deeply personal and, no-doubt, fundamental to our sense of self as our ability to reproduce.

As a result, making that first appointment to see an infertility doctor often seems like a gigantic leap. If you’re contemplating taking this step, it might be comforting to know the things that would likely occur at your first visit.

A blog by Chelsea Ritchie

My name is Chelsea and I’m just like you. I’m not a doctor, I am not a nurse. I have no medical training, although perhaps I could teach a shot injection class or two. I never saw infertility coming. When my husband Josh and I decided it was time to start a family over 5 years ago, we had no idea we would become the 1 in 8 couples who struggle.

a blog by Laurence A. Jacobs, M.D., Fertility Centers of Illinois

For everyone, stress and overeating can be a dastardly duo during the holidays. For infertility patients, the two can wreak havoc on your weight, your peace-of-mind and, yes, your fertility treatment.

It's no secret that patients who are at peak health and healthy weights — and are best able to manage the stresses of life and infertility — have more success with fertility treatment. That is why fertility practices such as mine partner with organizations such as Pullling Down the Moon to offer education on nutrition, exercise and stress management techniques— and how it all can impact your fertility.

Here's seven solutions to reduce your holiday stress and overeating.

I often get calls from prospective new clients who say, “I’ve never talked with a counselor before, but my doctor suggested I call you.” Knowing how difficult it must be to make this call, I want to offer some perspective on how I see it coming from the other direction.

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