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Trying to Conceive? Nurture Good, Healthy Eggs!


by Cindy Bailey of the Fertile Kitchen™, April 20, 2010

Does a fertility diet just work to keep your body -- which houses your developing embryo -- healthy? Or does it also have an effect on your eggs themselves? The answer: Good nutrition, along with other lifestyle factors -- such as keeping stress low and getting moderate exercise -- does impact the health of your eggs!

Women are born with all the eggs they’ll ever have. Those eggs are dormant until they begin the process of maturing for release, when your brain (or a doctor) triggers certain hormones to stimulate egg growth. Once the egg matures it will release from the ovary and travel through the fallopian tube into the uterus.

When your eggs begin their maturation process, having access to healthy nutrients does make a difference in their health. Calcium, for example, aids in embryonic development, by triggering growth.

Another important factor in healthy eggs is getting sufficient blood circulation to the reproductive area. Moderate exercise can help; so can acupuncture. Also, check out this article on increasing the health of your eggs.

Bottom line: Your diet makes a difference!

Here's what Philip E. Chenette, M.D., said in the Foreword to our book, The Fertile Kitchen (tm): "There is no doubt that every human is a product of a unique recipe in the form of DNA from the sperm and egg in combination with nutritional building blocks needed to interpret that recipe."

Those nutritional building blocks come from what we eat, and they are so important to embryonic development.

So, watch what you eat for improved egg quality!

All the best!

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Comments (1)

Thanks for an informative article! There are so many things to consider health-wise before trying to conceive, such as diet, exercise, predisposition to certain diseases, weight, etc.
The more info out there the better!

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