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A Fertility Doctor's Job: Getting Women Pregnant

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a blog by David Kreiner, M.D., F.A.C.O.G., March 2, 2010

Last night I tucked my grandson Jayden into bed. “Saba,” which is Hebrew for grandfather, Jayden said, “What do you do at work?” I thought back to when I first talked to his dad, my son Dan, about the birds and the bees. Well, I thought, I help those in need make babies but how do I explain this to a three year old?

I need to explain that my patients are suffering, some so severely that it affects their marriage, their jobs and often their health. I’m responsible for alleviating their suffering. I share my compassion for their troubles, hoping I may start to develop a bond with them.

I meet with each couple to try to evaluate the presence of any relationship problems. Sometimes these problems are sexual in nature, often related to difficulties with communication and, unfortunately, sometimes include violent behavior on the part of one or both spouses. Working with a program that employs a highly-trained mental health professional and a mind-body team approach helps alleviate stress, works on relationships and helps improve the health of my patients through nutrition, acupuncture and massage, as well as support groups. A healthier, less stressed patient with proper flow of Qi is more likely to conceive with my most advanced scientific infertility treatments available to man.

So I say to Jayden, “Saba is a doctor who helps people become mommies and daddies.” Jayden was not sure he was satisfied. His face frowned. He shrugged his shoulders and raised his arms, palms turned up. “How Saba?” he asked.

“With G-d’s help and the help of all those good dedicated men and women who work with me in the office,” I replied. With that, I looked at my grandson with all the joy and love a grandparent can feel for his grandchild, to which Jayden added, “Can we play another game of Wii?”

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