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Boom or Bust?


a blog by Liz

I’m sure I’m not the only one cursing myself for not trying to breed earlier in my younger and (probably) more fertile days. At 32 (and 3/4), I am still considered young by doctors, acupuncturists and old-aged pensioners, but, after 2 1/2 years of not getting pregnant, I sure don’t feel it.

We had valid reasons for not trying to get pregnant when we were younger:

• We weren’t mature enough (still have doubts about that one);
• We wanted to establish ourselves in our careers;
• We needed to be in a place that had space for a child; and
• We wanted to have financial security.

Note that three out of four of those reasons for waiting are inextricably linked to cold, hard cash. Which is why trying to have a kid in these credit-crunched times might seem idiotic.*

I predict birth rates in the western world will fall over the next 12 months and the only people who are going to have kids will fall into one of three categories:

1) Mistakes (be they happy accidents or catastrophic errors in judgement / prophylactic procedures);
2) Older people whose biological clock won’t let them sleep at night for the sound of the ticking;
3) Us, the infertiles, who have been plugging away at the TTC game even before the financial crisis was a bubble in the champagne glass of a city banker. Whether we have been trying for six months or six years, we aren’t going to give up because of a blip in the stock prices of just about every company in the Western world.

Every cycle is sacred. We might not be able to buy a top-of-the-line pram and we may use hand-me-downs rather than brand new baby clothes (hopefully, that won’t be so hard to do as the pain we feel at seeing our friends get pregnant and give birth before us will turn to delight as we pick up their second hand goods). We’ve already hopped on the conception train and we aren’t about to stop until we pull up at the baby station or the train crashes.

Time is far more concerning than finances.

And you never know, having a child now, when most people are holding off until they know if they will still have a job upon finishing maternity leave, might mean our kids have less competition when they get into the workplace, thus will be able to pay off our treatment debts for us.
You know, if you want to take the long-term, sunny-side up view.

*Of course I may have gotten this totally wrong and there will be a baby boom as people try to save money by not going out, turning into bed early and have nothing better to do with their time than playing hide the sausage.

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