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Infertility and Mother's Day Coping Strategies

Celebrating your own mom may work, but if not, take a day for yourself

Sunday is Mother’s Day. Unlike Valentine’s Day, which focuses on the couple, this commercialized day can be one of the hardest days for a woman coping with infertility.

“Mother’s Day can be a double whammy,” says Andrea Mechanick Braverman, Ph.D., a Pennsylvania health psychologist who specializes in infertility counseling. “Another anniversary of a year gone by without a baby — and a holiday that specifically excludes you.”

The Thin Line Between Happy for You and Sad for Me

woman looking out window

a blog by Jenn Nixon, September 14, 2016

There is an invisible bar we infertiles constantly teeter on whenever one of our loved ones becomes pregnant; we struggle amid genuine excitement for their success, and nagging disappointment at our own failure. It’s the line between happy for you and sad for me. A place I know all too well.

Here Comes Father's Day

Just when you thought it was safe ...

a blog by Ellen Glazer, June 17, 2016

Just as we are all recovering from Mother’s Day, the other Hallmark Holiday is fast approaching, just about a month away. While I find Mother’s Day to be the single most difficult day of the year for anyone struggling with infertility, Father’s Day is not exactly a breeze.

Performance Issues Trying to Conceive

Under the Sheets

When a couple decides to officially try to have a baby, the initial part of the process can be a lot of fun. Suddenly thinking about baby names is no longer the equivalent of a school girl doodling her fantasy married name in a notebook, but a within-reach reality. The birth control and condoms go flying out the window, and in their place come hope and sex with a purpose. There are periods in a month where you know that no matter how rough your day at work is, when you get home you're having sex. Not only is sex this great, fun thing you get to do strictly for a few moments of pleasure, but it's actually a down payment on a life goal. It's like waking up one day and finding out that raw chocolate chip cookie dough is actually going to make you thinner.

Finding Purpose Through Infertility


A blog by Fresh Conceptions, March 11, 2016
Infertility is a personal battle that challenges you physically, mentally, and emotionally. It tests your marriage, friendships, and faith. Even after reaching the other side, you're often left with scars that may never fade away.

Top 5 Ways to Cope with Infertility over the Holidays

Methods to preserve your sanity when you're feeling the pressure

It’s that time of the year again, when you can’t walk into a store without tripping over a seasonal display or turn on a radio station without hearing some holiday tunes. But while it seems like everyone else may be in the holiday spirit, you’re just not feeling the cheer this year.

The holiday season can be tough on couples who are struggling with infertility or are currently receiving fertility treatments, largely because of its focus on family, which can then expand to children, babies and pregnancy. One of the most common holiday stressors for a person or couple with infertility is the fact that they are surrounded by children at the holidays, albeit their beloved nieces, nephews, and cousins, it doesn't fill the void like a child of their own would.

“Holidays are based on family, and it’s almost impossible to avoid that,” says Dr. John Rinehart, a reproductive endocrinologist and founding partner of the Reproductive Medicine Institute in Chicago. “There are toy ads on TV, parties with a bunch of children running around. And if you’re the one who’s trying to have a child, but there are problems, that can be hard.”

#TwoFertilityWords No, Not Crazy & Obsessed. How About Focused & Deliberate?

a blog by Lisa Rosenthal, September 16, 2015
This experience of infertility changes us. We evolve. We are not the same people we are when we start. Not all the changes are at all welcome. We can become bitter, angry, frustrated, seemingly mean-spirited (especially when it comes to other's pregnancies or babies), depressed, withdrawn. This experience of infertility offers us other words to describe ourselves as well. What are your #Twofertilitywords?

Can a Coping Technique Increase IVF Success?

A blog by Amira Posner, Healing Infertility, June 8, 2015
"Letting go coping" is an alternative way of addressing the worries, anxieties and stress responses that go hand in hand with infertility. The technique is associated with successful IVF treatment outcomes.

Five Things That Helped Me Cope With Infertility

A blog by Stephanie Levich, Family Match Consulting, May 29, 2015

Even though I had worked in the fertility field for over a decade before I found out that I too needed help to have a baby, I still was completely overwhelmed and frankly pretty devastated. But thankfully, IVF was my savior and now I've made it my mission to help others get through this crazy roller coaster ride we call infertility. Here are five things I did that helped me cope through my personal journey.

Let's Start Talking More About Infertility

A blog by Amira Posner, Healing Infertility, April 8, 2015
At my last Mind Body Fertility Support Group, two women recognized each other from their workplace. At first, they looked at each other with eyes of dismay. Not for one second had it occurred to either of them that somebody else in their workplace was experiencing the same problems as each had encountered. But, by the sixth week of group the two women were coming together from work, sitting beside each other and supporting one another like best friends. Their initial dismay turned into compassion when they were able to bond through the common experience of struggling to conceive. This story should not be so surprising. When you think about the fact that 1 in 6 couples struggle with infertility, you likely know someone that it is affected.


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