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What Are the Causes and Treatment of Azoospermia?

Jeremy Kaufman M.D. at Men’s Health & Fertility Center of Fairfield County discusses what causes Azoospermia and how to treat Azoospermia.

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Link Between Child Abuse and Infertility

ASRM,  Oct 22, 2012

Research out of Harvard University and the University of California San Francisco have found a link between childhood abuse and later reproductive disorders.

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Vaccinations During Infertility Treatment and Pregnancy

October 15, 2012

An update from The Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine advises women of reproductive age to advocate for their health and proactively track their immunizations, particularly prior to infertility treatment and pregnancy. One study showed that fewer than 60% of OB-GYNs surveyed routinely asked their patients about vaccination history and only 10% offered vaccinations recommended to women in their reproductive years. National vaccination standards are established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and were last updated in February 2012.

Fertility Doctor of the Month: Larry Lipshultz, M.D.

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

Larry Lipshultz, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine Houston, TX

October 2011

FertilityAuthority is pleased to recognize Larry Lipshultz, M.D., a world-renowned expert in male reproductive medicine and microsurgery as Fertility Doctor of the Month. The Baylor College of Medicine professor is a pioneer in urological microsurgery and has performed more than 2,000 vasectomy reversals at his clinic in Houston, Texas. In addition, people come from all over the United States and the world to receive treatment for male reproductive health issues.

Fathers Less Likely to Die from Heart Disease

USA Today,  Sept 27, 2011

New research suggests that dads are a little less likely to die of heart-related problems than childless men are. The study — by the AARP, the government and several universities — is the largest ever on male fertility and mortality, involving nearly 138,000 men. Although a study like this can't prove that fatherhood and mortality are related, there are plenty of reasons to think they might be, several heart disease experts said.

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Sperm Gene May Explain Some Male Infertility

Time,  July 20, 2011
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A mutation in a gene for a sperm-related protein found in 20% of men may be responsible for a significant proportion of unexplained male infertility, according to researchers at University of California-Davis. They studied the impact of the gene, called DEFB126, in 500 Chinese newlyweds attempting to start a family. In couples where the man had two copies of the mutant version, the odds of childbirth in any given month were reduced by 30% and the average time to conception was delayed by two months compared to couples in which the male had only one or no copies of the aberrant gene.

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How a Form of Varicose Veins Can Make Men Depressed and Infertile

The Daily Mail,  July 12, 2011
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More men than ever suffer from depression and male infertility rates are also on the rise. Now an eminent surgeon believes he’s identified a significant cause of both — varicose veins in the testes, or varicoceles, a condition affecting up to 15 percent of men. The suggestion is that thousands of men could avoid these problems with low-risk preventive surgery.

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Surprising Causes of Male Infertility

The Wall Street Journal,  June 28, 2011
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A number of lifestyle choices, environmental factors and chance events can sabotage the sperm: an adolescent groin injury, cigarette smoking, heavy drinking, intense cycling and even using a laptop directly on the lap. About 70 percent of male infertility is treatable, according to experts, and in about 25 percent of cases, it could have been avoided with greater awareness of the lifestyle choices that can harm sperm.

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Pregnant Mothers Taking Prenatal Folic Acid May Not Help Boost Sons' Fertility

Reuters,  June 24, 2011

Young men whose mothers took folic acid supplements while pregnant did not grow up to produce healthier sperm, a small Danish study has found. The research, published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, was the first to compare the quality of sperm from sons of mothers-to-be who took folic acid with sperm from men whose mothers did not take the B vitamin. Because the study was small, however, other researchers say they view the results with caution.

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