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It Is Virtually Impossible to Interpret Fertility Clinic Success Rates

It has never been more difficult for a patient entering an American fertility clinic to understand her likelihood of being able to have a baby with its assistance. Although the success rates of in vitro fertilization (IVF) achieved by individual fertility clinics are publicly available, the relative utility of the reporting structure has been eclipsed by new advances in the techniques of assisted reproduction. Recent changes in the approach to care by IVF programs have made it virtually impossible for the general public to interpret pregnancy outcome data.

Transparency in Fertility Clinic Reporting

Fertility Success Rates

Healthcare reporting in Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) seemingly provides transparency by publishing in vitro fertilization (IVF) success rates reported by fertility clinics in the U.S. The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publish fertility clinic success rates annually. But a recent study indicated that there is decreased transparency in ART reporting. An increasing number of IVF cycles are excluded from the SART report annually, leading to reported improved clinical outcomes and as a result, increased market share for 13 U.S. fertility clinics.

Honesty in IVF Reporting

Honesty in IVF Reporting

Why is it so important for fertility clinics to show honesty in IVF reporting? The answer is simple. Each clinic abides by its own rules and general guidelines set forth by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) for cancelled cycles, number of embryos transferred, which patients are rolled into the research group (thus allowing the outcome of their cycle to go without reporting), and age or diagnosis cut-offs for IVF patients.

How Important Are IVF Success Rates When Choosing Your Fertility Clinic?

January 21, 2013

It may seem as though success rates are the most influential factor when choosing a fertility clinic. While in vitro fertilization (IVF) success rates are important, they are only one part of the bigger picture. The CDC requires fertility clinics to report their data according to specific guidelines, however, success rates can be affected by a number of variables.

Understanding The CDC Report on IVF Success Rates

a blog by Kim Griffiths, January 19, 2013

We’ve all been there. Scouring the internet for information on the best fertility clinics in the country based on IVF success rates. Guilty as charged. But, did you know that there is a lot more to the CDC and SART reports than meets the eye? It turns out that while the CDC requires fertility clinics to report their data based on the same guidelines, that data can mean different things at the clinical level.

Pittsburgh, PA Fertility Clinic Success Rates

Success rates can help you find your fertility clinic match

When it comes to choosing a fertility clinic, success rates rank among the factors you should consider. The Assisted Reproductive Technology Report, released by the CDC details the number and type of IVF cycles at each clinic. The following information is for fresh, non-donor egg IVF cycles.

San Jose, CA Fertility Clinic Success Rates

Success rates can help you determine which fertility clinic is right for you

Success rates are an important determining factor when choosing a fertility clinic. The Assisted Reproductive Technology Report, released by the CDC breaks down the number and type of IVF cycles at each clinic.

Phoenix Fertility Clinic Success Rates

IVF success rates in Phoenix, AZ

Comparing success rates of fertility clinics you are interested in working with is an important step. You can find the information in the Assisted Reproductive Technology Report. Produced by the CDC, this report breaks up success rates by different kinds of IVF procedures.

Houston Fertility Clinic Success Rates

Live birth rates from IVF cycles at Houston fertility clinics

Each year, every fertility clinic that is currently operating in the United States is required to submit their success rates for IVF procedures to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC then compiles this information into a report called the . Given the number of fertility clinics across the United States, it takes the CDC approximately 3 years to compile the report of fertility clinic success rates.

Central New Jersey Fertility Clinic Success Rates

Live birth rates for IVF cycles in central New Jersey

Federal laws require all fertility clinics to submit data on their in vitro fertilization (IVF) success rates annually to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The data is published in the Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Report. It takes the CDC approximately three years to collect and review this information.

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