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Should Women Freeze Ovarian Tissue to Have Babies Later in Life?

Forbes,  April 5, 2012

When headlines read declarations like, “Scientists can halt menopause with ovary transplants,” you have to raise an eyebrow. A doctor at an infertility clinic has indeed performed “ovary transplants” on a small number of infertile women who have gone on to healthy pregnancies and births. Though this sounds futuristic, it’s certainly possible (it uses a piece of ovarian tissue, not the whole organ), and not so surprising as his other suggestion: That the procedure might help women avoid menopause altogether.

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Ovary Transplant Study Offers Fertility Hope

Yahoo 7 News,  Mar 26, 2012

Women may be able to halt the menopause and preserve their fertility after doctors proved ovary transplants remain effective for at least seven years. Ovarian tissue transplants would allow women more choice about when to have children and would offer hope to those who believe they would never be able to conceive.Three women, who have already received transplants, have given birth to seven children, with one expecting another baby soon.

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Stem Cells Might One Day Form Human Eggs, Research Finds

Cleveland Plain Dealer,  Mar 19, 2012

For the first time ever, researchers have proven the existence of egg-producing stem cells in the ovaries of humans. The breakthrough throws open the door — albeit years down the road — to the possibility that women in their 30s and 40s, whose fertility is on the decline, could replenish their dwindling egg supplies.

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Fertility Shock for Women

TheWest.com,  Mar 20, 2012

For some women, statistics relating to age and fertility can be something of a shock. Women reach their maximum fertility before 30, according to Access Australia, Australia's National Infertility Network. But between the ages of 35 and 40 the fertility rate drops by at least 30 percent. That's not to say you should throw in the towel. Statistics released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics only a few months ago showed that, while Australia's overall total fertility rate dropped slightly, fertility rates for women aged 35-39 and 40-45 actually increased from the previous year.

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Genetic Test to Predict IVF Egg Production in Older Women

by Leigh Ann Woodruff, March 19, 2012

A specific gene may have a lot to do with your chances of IVF success, particularly if you are undergoing treatment at an older age.

According to an ovarian aging study published in March 2012 in the medical journal PLoS One, a genotype (the genetic make-up of a trait) of the FMR1 gene preserves a woman's ability to produce eggs well into the 40s. Conducted by the Center for Human Reproduction in New York, the study compared egg yields during in vitro fertilization (IVF) in women above age 40 with varying FMR1 genotypes and sub-genotypes.

Survey Reveals New Zealand Women's Fertility Concerns

Voxy,  Mar 16, 2012

An online survey conducted by Good Health magazine, to establish New Zealand women's views on fertility, has revealed some surprising results. The key problems New Zealand women said they encountered while trying to conceive were Endometriosis/Polycystic Ovarian (32%), unexplained infertility (31%), recurrent miscarriage (20%), age (16%), and male fertility issues (16%). In addition, 93 percent of Kiwi women agree more should be done to promote ways to improve fertility, and 63 percent have friends and family who have experienced fertility issues.

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DES: The Pill that Left a Generation Blighted by Cancer

Daily Mail,  Mar 12, 2012

Heather Justice was just 25 when cervical cancer struck. To save her life, surgeons had to perform radical — and distressing — surgery to remove her womb and vagina, but unfortunately that wasn’t the end of her ordeal. Further investigations led to the start of one of Britain’s longest-running and most shocking drug scandals. Heather, now 59, was the UK’s first confirmed case of DES-related injury. DES, or diethylstilboestrol, was prescribed to pregnant women — including Heather’s mother Gladys — from the 50s to the 70s in the mistaken belief that it prevented miscarriage.

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New Option for Fertility after Cancer

Fox 23,  Mar 6, 2012

A few weeks ago, 17-year-old Julianna Mai was diagnosed with cancer, and she is on her second round of chemo. Not only is she fighting cancer, she also had to make a choice about her future as a parent, a decision 130,000 newly-diagnosed cancer patients of reproductive age must make every year. Since Julianne needed chemo right away, she opted to have one of her ovaries removed and frozen for the future. Ovaries are transplanted either back in the forearm or chest wall because of the rich blood supply found there. Later, in-vitro fertilization can take place.

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Infertility 'More Common Among Childhood Cancer Survivors'

International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics,  Mar 7, 2012

Children who suffer from cancer are more likely to suffer from fertility problems as an adult, according to a German study published in Deutsches Arzteblatt International, which included the analysis of data from 2,754 former pediatric oncology patients. The authors suggested fertility protection measures should be explained to children with cancer and their parents before treatment is decided upon.

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For Sex, Christmas Outdoes Valentine's Day

UPI,  Mar 4, 2012

For sex, Valentine's Day cannot compete, at least statistically, with Christmas -- the time of year couples have the most sex, U.S. fertility experts said. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta showed more births take place in September than any other month of the year -- making December the month with the highest fertility rates.

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