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Mystery of Female Orgasm Continues to Baffle Scientists

International Business Times,  Sept 7, 2011
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There have been many attempts to explain the evolutionary mystery of female orgasm. One, suggested by Desmond Morris in his 1967 popular-science book "The Naked Ape," was that the female orgasm evolved to encourage physical intimacy with a male partner and helps reinforce the pair bond. Other theories are based on the idea that the female orgasm might increase fertility. For example, a 30 percent reduction in size of the vagina could help clench onto the penis which would make it more stimulating for the male.

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Chemotherapy Has Greater Effect on Women's Fertility than Previously Thought

Examiner.com,  Aug 24, 2011

Women who undergo chemotherapy may suffer more damage to their reproductive health than previously believed. That’s the suggestion of a new study conducted by researchers from the Univeristy of California, San Franciso and published online in the journal Cancer. The researchers found chemotherapy essentially narrows a woman’s reproductive window by causing a range of damage to the ovaries, even if her menses resume after treatment.

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Birds, Bees and Infertility

The Washington Post,  Aug 19, 2011
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Creating a video with a woman dressed as a bird and a man dressed as, yes, a bee — rapping, no less, about their inability to conceive — was a bit of risky venture. But that’s just what the pharmaceutical company EMD Serono, maker of a fertility drug called Gonal-f, has done. The video, “Early Bird Catches the Sperm” and posted on the Facebook page “Birds & Bees: The Real Story,” is meant to raise awareness and to encourage couples having difficulty conceiving to consult a reproductive endocrinologist.

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Scientists Find How 'Sticky' Egg Captures Sperm

The Star,  Aug 18, 2011
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Scientists have uncovered exactly how a human egg captures an incoming sperm to begin the process of fertilization and say their discovery could in future help couples who suffer from infertility. In a study in the journal Science, an international team of researchers found that a specific kind of sugar molecule makes the outer coat of the egg “sticky,” helping the egg and sperm bind together.

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Economic Turmoil Taking Its Toll on Childbearing

USA Today,  Aug 12, 2011
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Women starting families today might not think they have a lot in common with women during the Great Depression, but a new government analysis of birth data suggests otherwise. The struggling economy may be causing women of childbearing age to have fewer or no children, suggests demographer Sharon Kirmeyer of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, lead author of two reports out Thursday that analyzed historical childbearing data. Census data show that in 2010, 18.8 percent of women ages 40 to 44 were childless, echoing a trend from the 1930s found in the CDC analysis. The U.S.

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Cooler Months Raise Sperm Quality, Chance of Producing a Baby

The Jerusalem Post,  Aug 7, 20
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Couples who have fertility problems due to low-quality sperm would be well advised to plan their calendars: Soroka University Medical Center researchers have found that the quality of semen – both the amount of sperm and their motility – is better in the winter and the fall than in the spring or summer. Dr. Eliahu Levitas, a senior physician in the hospital’s in-vitro fertilization unit, reported to a recent meeting of the Israel Society for Fertility Research about his statistical study of 6,453 semen samples collected at Soroka.

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Women Should Deal with Fertility Issues Early

The Tennessean,  July 29, 2011
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In my 20-plus years as a women’s health expert, I have been witnessing a disturbing trend. Women are waiting longer to seek treatment for fertility issues, a decision that greatly reduces the chances of conceiving a healthy baby. According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, the mean age of women walking through the door at one reproductive center in Colorado has increased from 32 to 39. Sadly, the same is true at my practice in Nashville.

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50-Year-Old Australian Woman Gives Birth without IVF

news.com.au,  July 27, 2011
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A 50-year-old Queensland woman has made history as the oldest Australian woman to fall pregnant naturally and give birth to a healthy first child. Semi-retired Gold Coast real estate agent Anthea Nicholas had a "one-in-several-million" chance of conceiving without resorting to in vitro fertilization (IVF), and her chances of miscarriage were up to 70 per cent. Nicholas Jay, now 5 weeks old, was born perfectly healthy.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/year-old-queensland-woman-anthea-nicholas-gives-birth-without-ivf/story-e6frfku0-1226102746741#ixzz1TIsmwhW6

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Baby-Making Sex Scheduling Conflicts

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Couples get creative

a blog by Alec, July 26, 2011

To read more Alec The Infertility Guy blogs, CLICK HERE.

An infertile couple was kind enough to tell me this story about baby-making sex. Per my promise to respect anonymity, you’ll have the initials of the storytellers.

As it was relayed to me:

    My Fertility Crisis

    Wall Street Journal,  July 23, 2011
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    We hear a lot of stories about successful fertility treatments. But there are a lot of untold stories without such happy endings. Holly Finn, author of "The Baby Chase," talks about the emotional and financial toll of in vitro treatments, and the often heartbreaking outcome.

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